Driving Through The Data Downpour With Smart Transportation

Smart city transportation is an ever-evolving category with many names. City transportation assets are basically cars, scooters, roads and public transit (trains, buses, etc.). But injecting “smart” into the equation opens the door to a whole host of other possibilities like autonomous vehicles, V2X (vehicle talking to everything), smart parking, multi-modal transit, traffic management, e-hailing and more.

Connected Vehicles: When the Leader Doesn’t Always Win Alone

Platform Equinix™ provides the ideal environment to test and build these processes, in collaboration with competitors and partners alike. Data sharing within this ecosystem translates into connected vehicle innovation, with insights shared between automotive players, technology providers, automotive suppliers and digital regulators amongst other

How to Make Intelligent Cars a Reality on the Roads

Connected cars use vast amounts of data. In just one hour, a connected car will upload 25 GB/data to the cloud – exceeding the storage capacity of most modern smartphones and equaling roughly 12 HD films. In total, around 4,000 GB/data will be used a day. To put this in context, a smart hospital will use around 3,000 GB.

When Is a Connected Car Not a Car?

Cars are mobile – it’s why they were invented, to move us from here to there. Connected cars can’t depend on traditional IT infrastructures that are centralized and fixed, with data traffic running back and forth between a distant corporate data center.

Where Connected Cars Are Headed – Fast

The auto industry is gathering at the North American Auto Show in Detroit this week, after making a splash at the Consumer Electronics Show in Las Vegas last week. For years, we’ve been hearing about the car’s transformation to a “smartphone on four wheels,” and judging by what’s been on display in Detroit and Las Vegas, cars with the capabilities of a smartphone are the least of what’s ahead.

Why Connected Cars Are Driving Companies Out to the Network Edge

The connected car of tomorrow is coming, and, frankly, it’s going